The Haunting: A Peek Into Michigan’s Holocaust Memorial Museum

The Haunting: A Peek Into Michigan’s Holocaust Memorial Museum

What was one of the most essential resources of the Nazi regime to carry out The Final Solution? The railroad. The train car is the first thing you see when you walk into the Holocaust Memorial Museum. With ease, it sets the tone for the somber world you are about to step into.

The Railroad - Photo courtesy of the Jewish Virtual Library
The Railroad – Photo courtesy of the Jewish Virtual Library

The Mission

Speakers and survivors support the mission of the institution. They remember those who perished and highlight those who stood up to evil rather than rode the waves into the destructive behavior of the time.
Walking through the campus can be overwhelming. There is so much history and culture to experience before you make it to the Holocaust portion, but it is worth the time. It helps people understand what the Jewish people had gone through prior to Hitler coming to power.

Exhibits

The train car is the first thing you see when you walk into the memorial. With ease, it sets the tone for the somber world you are about to step into. For more than 25 years, The Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus in Farmington Hills has been teaching about the Holocaust and its legacy. The museum boasts the archives of 9 exhibits: The Eternal Flame and Memorial Wall, The Timeline, Museum of European and Jewish Heritage, Descent into Nazism, The Camp System, The Abyss, The Postwar Period, Portraits of Honor, and The Institute of Righteousness. All exhibits focus not only on the history of Judaism and antisemitism, but on the heroes, ethics, and how we process and move forward from this atrocity.

 

Anne Frank. Photo Courtesy of the Holocaust Memorial Center
Anne Frank. Photo Courtesy of the Holocaust Memorial Center

To further educate the community, the memorial hosts a carousel of rotating exhibits.  Anne Frank: A History for Today will be arriving January 20, 2017 as the newest collection at the site. It will run until June 4. The gallery will be displayed in a timeline format to show what happened to the Frank family during the events of the Holocaust.
“What is so special about this exhibit is that it helps visitors truly grapple with what was happening in Europe through the lens of a young girl,” said Robin Axelrod, Director of Education, Holocaust Memorial Center. “At the time when acceptance of others is at such a low point, the lessons that Anne Frank: A History for Today teaches are more important than ever.”

The Star of David. Photo courtesy of the Holocaust Memorial Museum
The Star of David. Photo courtesy of the Holocaust Memorial Museum

Location and Hours

The Holocaust Memorial Center is located at 28123 Orchard Lake Rd, Farmington Hills. This historical site is open Monday 9:30am-8:30pm, Sunday, Tuesday- Thursday 9:30-5pm, and Friday 9:30am-3pm. They are closed Saturday and all Jewish Holidays. The public can see the exhibits for $8. Students receive a $2 discount.
Let this memorial inspire you into action to educate yourself, and to protect those in danger of becoming a victim.
It is our duty to remember the 6 million Jews and 5 million others that were systematically killed.
Otherwise, who will?
Visit the Holocaust Memorial Center’s website to find more information. You can also volunteer for the memorial and donations are always appreciate.  http://www.holocaustcenter.org/home

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Author of Define Decaf: Lessons from a Highly Caffeinated Young Adult from a farm in Hell, currently residing in Grand Rapids. I love coffee, traveling, and playing on the shores of Lake Michigan 365 days a year, even when the ice caves appear. What do you like to do? Connect with me on twitter @gradschooldiary or email kim@awesomemitten.com